The Benefits of Ice Baths
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The Benefits of Ice Baths

Ice baths is a type of muscle therapy that focuses on reducing the amount of muscle soreness one experiences in the 72 hour period after working out. By implementing this technique into you day it can impact your workout results and your life in a very positive way. The extra 5-15 minutes a day can really go a long way.

What Are Ice Baths?

Ice baths are a technique that have also become more popular in common athletes, recently. Basically, after a workout you fill a tub of cold water with about 3 bags of ice, and step in the tub and sit for about 15 minutes. This 15 minutes is said to help combat muscle soreness and speed up recovery time. By doing this regularly, you will experience much less muscle soreness, which, in turn, will allow you to exercise better, and exercise more often.

The Science behind Ice Baths

The science behind ice baths is simple. As you may know, when working out, extremely small tears develop in your muscles, which will eventually be rebuilt into better, stronger muscles. However, this can also result in a lot of pain for about 1-3 days after exercise. To combat the pain, soreness, and stiffness, one experiences when working out, an ice bath can be used. The ice bath will cause the blood vessels to become restricted. When removing one's self from the bath, blood begins circulating again, which helps speed the healing process and remove lactic acid build up in the muscles.

Why you Should Take Ice Baths

This technique is questioned among people who believe that soreness is not a problem for them. However, soreness is a major problem for all people working out. Soreness can have a significant impact on one's lifestyle. Every movement after workout can  create pain and cause the body to be under a tremendous amount of stress. By taking an ice bath this will limit the stress that soreness can cause you. The bath can also, in turn, affect workout results. Rather than limit your workout because of soreness, you can increase weight, repetition, and volume, with your newly found strength, and become stronger than you ever had before. This lack of soreness can impact your life in so many ways that it is necessary to add to your workout program. 

Are Ice Baths Safe

Although ice baths are great for your body, like all things, too much of anything can be bad for you. An extremely important reminder to those hoping to implement ice baths into their routine is do not overdo it. Staying in the ice bath too long can actually become dangerous for the body, and have the opposite affect on your muscles. Staying in the tub longer than a period of 30 minutes can result in hypothermia and or muscle injury, which will result in a tremendous amount of pain along with an absence of exercise for the duration of the injury. Keep a watch or clock near you so you can keep track of the amount of time you have spent in the tub. 

Other Benefits

There have been many claims among ice bath users that it can also affect the body in many other positive ways. Many users have stated that it can help prompt sleep. Taking an ice bath up to an hour before bed can help the bather to fall asleep faster, and sleep better. Other benefits can include a reduction in muscle inflammation, restores muscles faster, and it also can keep the body more flexible.

The Bottom Line

The bottom line is that any athlete or ordinary person, who is hoping to feel less soreness or fatigue, should implement this into their routine. The extra 5-15 minutes a day in the bath can have amazing effects for the user. Just remember, when you exit the ice bath always put on warm clothing and don't take a hot shower. 

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Comments (1)

Think maybe "science" should be supported by scientific evidence?

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